Pioneering architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable has died at 91

A portrait of architecture critic in 1986. Via the WSJ

Ada Louise Huxtable (1921-2013), known as “the dean of American architectural criticism”, has passed away at the age of 91 at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan. Winner of the first Pulitzer Prize for Criticism, Huxtable began her legendary career when she was appointed as The New York Times’ first architecture critic in 1963. Her sharp mind and straightforward critiques paved the way for contemporary architectural journalism and called for public attention to the significance of architecture.

As Paul Goldberger describes in his 1996 Tribute to Ada Louise Huxtable, “Ada Louise Huxtable has been more than just the most important pioneer of architectural criticism in newspapers in our time: she has been the most important figure in communicating the urgency of some kind of belief in the values of the man-made environment in our time, too. She has made people pay attention. She has made people care. She has made architecture matter in our culture in a way that it did not before her time.”

Get an understanding of Huxtable’s influential voice with her latest critique on Foster+Partners’ proposed renovation for the New York Public Library here.

Cite: Rosenfield, Karissa. "Pioneering architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable has died at 91" 07 Jan 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 20 Sep 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=315769>

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