Emu Bay House / Max Pritchard Architect

Sam noonan - Copyrighted

Architects: Max Pritchard Architect
Location: Emu Bay, SA,
Project year: 2008
Photographs: Sam Noonan

Sam noonan - Copyrighted Sam noonan - Copyrighted Sam noonan - Copyrighted Sam noonan - Copyrighted

Conceptual Framework

With an exposed site of sweeping views, the clients required a relaxed holiday home that maximizes views, but provided sheltered outdoor areas.

Built Form

The living area, with its dominant floating “lid” roof, emphasizes the drama of the exposed site. Two bedroom wings radiate from this core, and enclose a rear sheltered courtyard focusing on a wood fired pizza oven. Indented timber decks, either side of the living area, provide other options for sheltered outdoor living, with the choice dictated by wind direction.

Sam noonan - Copyrighted

The building is elevated a meter above the ground to maximize the view and reinforce the dramatic form.

Sustainability

Double glazing and high performance glass, cross ventilation and fans for cooling and a highly efficient combustion heater for heating, minimize energy use. Hot water is from an efficient electric heat pump.

Sam noonan - Copyrighted

Client needs

Clients report their enjoyment of the house, with the variety of outdoor living spaces encouraging a relaxed holiday lifestyle.

Cite: "Emu Bay House / Max Pritchard Architect" 08 Aug 2009. ArchDaily. Accessed 17 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=31084>

9 comments

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    i like how the main living space works with the outdoor spaces– it seems like they work well together. but i have to say… there are some things that really start to seem arbitrary when it gets down to the detailing. the shapes and forms.

  2. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Nice simple and clean design. Love the the orientation and the how it has taken advantage of the site and views. Gotta luv the wood fired pizza oven. Wish I had one. :)

  3. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Exterior: remarkable. Interior: remarkably pedestrian. I very much like how the floating roof maintains the purity of form of the other portions of the house. But I am struck by how the loftiness of the floating roof translates to the interior volume below. I think this may be in part because of the sheetrocked walls that don’t really hint at how the roof is an independent unit from the adjoining forms.

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