High Square / Francisco J. Nicolás Ruy-Díaz

© Javier Orive

Architects: Francisco J. Nicolás Ruy-Díaz
Location: , Andalucía,
Area: 2,050 sqm
Year: 2008
Photography: Javier Orive

© Javier Orive

Along the course of the Route N331 in Aguilar de la Frontera (see “Adaptation of Route N331”), there were some pieces of land tagged as “public space” still undeveloped. During the conception of the project it was found crucial to put them in charge in order to attract locals to this area of the city which has been unnoted for decades.

© Javier Orive

This particular plot lied between the avenue, which is quite steep at that point, and a narrow street that is five meters lower. As a result the plot degenerated to waste land which was very difficult to refurbish. According to the principles of the project, harnessing our resources to the full, it was decided to empty the plot at the height of the lower street to create a parking lot, and then build a square accessible from the avenue above it.

© Javier Orive

The square is compound by two platforms at different heights, to arrange the accesses from the avenue. The platforms host a set of islands that have the same distance to the lower and upper access, thus generating an artificial topography that becomes a three-dimensional dynamic space. The steps between the platforms and islands are covered by two-side benches that include the lightning, what makes the transitions smooth and the space homogenous.

© Javier Orive

The parking at the ground level is partially covered by the square, being integrated in the urbanization by spacious sidewalks that connect it with the side streets. The lightning plays with the changing shapes of the “ceiling”, showing the configuration of the upper square by being located at the edges of the platforms and islands.

Plan

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* Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.
Cite: "High Square / Francisco J. Nicolás Ruy-Díaz" 23 Nov 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 25 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=297560>

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