Daegu Gosan Public Library Competition Entry / Land+Civilization Compositions and Impressively Simple

Courtesy of and Impressively Simple

Designed by Land+Civilization Compositions and Impressively Simple, their proposal for the Daegu Gosan Public Library, titled ‘Open Source’, is consciously not a singular gesture, but more as a series of interpretable spaces. Previously libraries were seen as places to gain access to books, but this library provides places for the dissemination and sharing of knowledge. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Courtesy of Land+Civilization Compositions and Impressively Simple

Knowledge is not about libraries or books or the internet. The accumulation of knowledge is essentially the foundation of civilization. Libraries have traditionally been the locations to store the information. Now libraries have the opportunity to be much more. They are the hubs to access, share, and to discuss knowledge. They no longer are mainly about storage and preservation. They are about ease of access and about gathering of people.

Courtesy of Land+Civilization Compositions and Impressively Simple

Further, the nature of how the information is shared has changed. With the advent of digital technology space no longer needs to be spatially ordered. Spaces can be much more dynamic and flexible, allowing for users to shape them more freely. The users themselves can form new ways of gathering and sharing knowledge with each other. The library is their tool to be interpreted.

Architects: Land+Civilization Compositions and Impressively Simple
Location: Daegu,
Authors of Design: Artur Borejszo Architect and Urbanist, Jason Hilgefort Architect and Urbanist, Ignas Uogintas Architect and Urbanist
Team Members: Dalia Zakaitė Architect, Grisha Zotov Architect
Program: Library, social center, event space, café, children’s play space, public space
Area: 3,500 sqm

Cite: Furuto, Alison. "Daegu Gosan Public Library Competition Entry / Land+Civilization Compositions and Impressively Simple" 04 Nov 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 25 Oct 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=281270>