A “High Line” Makeover for A Former Railroad in Philly?

  • 12 Oct 2012
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The unused Reading Railroad, in .

From a park in a forgotten metro station to a human-sized “LEGO” bridge (see our post: The 4 Coolest “High Line” Inspired Projects), the massive success of New York City‘s High Line continues to inspire citizens across the globe to see their city’s forgotten spaces with new eyes – as opportunities for action.

The latest vision comes from a trio of plucky Landscape Architect Grads. Today, from 6-10 at Next American City‘s Storefront for Urban Innovation in Philadelphia, they’ll show what they would do with the unused, over-grown railroad (a.k.a the Reading Railroad, of Monopoly board fame) that at points dips under and peeks over the city.

The grads are hoping that the exhibit, called “Above, Below, Beyond: Futures for a Former Railroad,” will stir up debate and maybe even some action (which is highly likely, seeing as two other groups also have hopes for the spot, the Reading Viaduct Project and VIADUCTgreene). If you’re inspired but aren’t in Philly, you can contribute to their Kickstarter Campaign to help them offset exhibition costs (as of press time, they’re less than $2,000 short of their goal, with 5 days to go).

You can learn more about this project at the Above, Below, Beyond Web Site and Facebook Page

Temple University and UPenn Design Students share what they would do with the Reading Railroad.
View looking North from 12th and Vine on the Reading Railroad.
Cite: Quirk, Vanessa. "A “High Line” Makeover for A Former Railroad in Philly?" 12 Oct 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 18 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=280449>

2 comments

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    Doesn’t this post belong in the landscape section of ArchDaily? Or am I missing something? I feel this is a question of delineation between the two design professions. How should projects be organized and characterized?

  2. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    Excited to see these projects tonight. This idea has huge potential, just look at the width of the rail line in the first photo.

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