City Hall Várzea Paulista Competition Entry / Brazilian Architects

Courtesy of Brazilian Architects Team

Designed by Ana Cecília Tourinho, Analu Brandão, Gabriel Kozlowski, and Beni Barzellai, their competition entry for the City Hall creates a unity among all the planned projects for the downtown of . By proposing an infrastructural ring, the project functions as a public connector to embrace the existing green space and north and south. Connected to the public transportation system, it distributes and negotiates the confluence and flow of pedestrians while building a coherent image of the city’s entry. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Courtesy of Brazilian Architects Team

Regarding the building, cross superimposed volumes distribute the program in groups according to similarities and relationships between them. It generates a formal composition in which the program blocks (the Executive, the Legislative and Mais Fácil services) are clearly identified, facilitating the distribution of flows and access. The voids resulting from these volumes provide lightness to the built mass and promote constant natural lighting and ventilation.

Courtesy of Brazilian Architects Team

The special equipment such as the library, theatre, and auditorium, are distinguished by their shape, position and independent access. Despite the volumetric distinction the programs are physically connected. This proximity allows the contraction or dilatation of the space destined to each program according to unforeseen future demands. The traditional modular structure, the free plan, and the compact cores, which concentrate the accesses, the vertical circulation and the wet areas, allow greater constructive efficiency and agility.

Architects: Ana Cecília Tourinho, Analu Brandão, Gabriel Kozlowski, and Beni Barzellai
Location: Várzea Paulista,
Project Type: National Competition
Area: 17,878 m²
Year: 2012

Cite: Furuto, Alison. "City Hall Várzea Paulista Competition Entry / Brazilian Architects" 07 Oct 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 23 Sep 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=277784>

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