‘Beyond Green! Tall Buildings in a Sustainable Future’ Symposium

  • 29 Sep 2012
  • Events Sustainability
Courtesy of Institute for Lightweight Structures and Conceptual Design of the University of

Taking place October 10-12 at the University of Stuttgart, , the “Beyond Green! – Tall Buildings in a Sustainable Future” symposium focuses on how tall buildings be designed, built and maintained in a sustainable fashion. The keynote lectures will be held by Christoph Ingenhoven and Helmut Jahn_Murphy/Jahn. The sessions are dedicated to urban development and economy, ecology, planning and realization, structure and skin and building services. More information after the break.

Speakers include:

- Prof. Manfred Hegger_ee, Technical University Darmstadt, Germany
- Dr. Christine Lemaitre_DGNB, Stuttgart, Germany
- Peter Oborn_Aedas, London, United Kingdom
- Prof. Alexander Rudolphi_GföB, Berlin, Germany
- Prof. Dr. Arno Schlüter_SuAT, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
- Prof. Dr. Klaus Sedlbauer_Fraunhofer Institute for Buildings Physics, Germany
- Prof. Dr. Dr. E.h. Werner Sobek_ILEK, University of Stuttgart, Germany
- Wong Mun Summ_WOHA, Sinapore

In addition, representatives from Arup, Dominique Perrault Architecture, Drees und Sommer, Léon Wohlhage Wernik, L-Plan Lichtplanung, KONE and OVG re/developers will be speaking. As case studies, The Shard, London, UK (Renzo Piano Building Workshop, WSP) and the KfW Westarkade, Frankfurt, Germany (sauerbruch hutton, Werner Sobek) will be presented and discussed by the architects and engineers involved in the projects.

The symposium is organized by the Institute for Lightweight Structures and Conceptual Design of the University of Stuttgart. Partner organizations are the DGNB, the Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, the Institute for Building Physics of the University of Stuttgart, the aed and DAZ.

To register and for more information, please visit here.

 

Cite: "‘Beyond Green! Tall Buildings in a Sustainable Future’ Symposium" 29 Sep 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 26 Nov 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=274347>