Majestic Theatre Apartments / Hill Thalis Architecture

  • 09 Sep 2012
  • Housing Refurbishment Selected Works
© Brett Boardman

Architects: Hill Thalis Architecture
Location: ,
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Brett Boardman

Project Area: 1225.0 sqm
Engineers: Bekker Engineering Design Buro

The existing building was constructed in 1921 as the Majestic Theatre. It is a substantial brick volume with a highly worked, rendered facade to New Canterbury Road.

© Brett Boardman

The new project continues the long tradition of adaptive reuse of the structure on the site. It was first modified in 1953 to become a more contemporary cinema.

In 1979 it became the Majestic Roller Skating Rink and has accommodated a local social club up until is recent closure.

© Brett Boardman

The new works retain the existing building volume, roof profile and perimeter walls.
It provides ground floor commercial/ retail uses including street fronting cafè and 3 levels of residential apartments above, 27 units, a mix of one- and two bedroom apartments.

© Brett Boardman

The proposal interprets the historic internal volumes with two generous voids, occupied by residential circulation areas and semi outdoor gardens to achieve appropriate access to sunlight, light and ventilation for the apartments.

Elevation

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* Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.
Cite: "Majestic Theatre Apartments / Hill Thalis Architecture" 09 Sep 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 23 Oct 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=269294>
  • godryk

    Nice project and nice pictures. I like it when they show that pure white spaces can contain turkish carpets or colorful kilts, because sometimes architects love pictures of empty spaces with a couple of Barcelona chairs and a beautiful rock.

    Don’t get me wrong, I like those photographs too. As an architect, they let me appreciate better the spaces. However, due to obsrcure reasons, those pictures make some people believe that there must be some kind of contractual agreement that forces users to live in empty and barely furnished spaces. The great thing about the white box is that it lets you do all kinds of things, and if you want to rehearse with your baroque string ensemble in a room packed with your inherited rococo furniture, you sure can!