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Boston: The Least Sucky American City to be An Architect

Boston. Photo via Flickr CC User Raymond Larose.
Boston. Photo via Flickr CC User Raymond Larose.

According to a new survey published in Architect Magazine, Boston is starting to show “encouraging, though not significant, signs of improvement” in its architecture industry. Well, something’s better than nothing, right? A 2012 Architectural Survey, conducted by accounting firm CBIZ Tofiasv, found that profit per hour increased from 2010’s $5.54 to $6.89; and the direct labor utilization rate (aka the portion of payroll that pays for income-generating labor, not training, administration, time off, etc.) also increased from last year, which in turn was an improvement over the three previous years. But it’s not all rosy in Beantown. First of all, the 2011–2012 increase wasn’t huge, and, what’s more, the overhead rate didn’t drop. In 2007, it was $47.27; in 2011, $59.09, reported the Boston Business Journal. We got flurries of responses when we asked “What’s the best country to find work?” but we didn’t think to ask: “What’s the best American city to find work?” If these small economic flutterings are anything to go by, could Boston be the answer? Share your thoughts in the comments below. Story via Architect Magazine

Cite:Vanessa Quirk. "Boston: The Least Sucky American City to be An Architect" 22 Aug 2012. ArchDaily. Accesed . <http://www.archdaily.com/264740/boston-the-least-sucky-american-city-to-be-an-architect/>