‘Can Public Space be Used to Regenerate Urban Life?’ Roundtable Discussion / Casanova + Hernandez Architecten

© Christian Richters

As part of the 5th International Architecture Biennale in Rotterdam, Casanova + Hernandez Architecten will be putting on the ‘Can public space be used to regenerate urban life?’ roundtable discussion today, June 26 at 3:00pm.

This roundtable discussion is based on the one-year postgraduate studio entitled “Public Space Acupuncture”, that has been guided at the Berlage Institute by Helena Casanova and by Jesus Hernandez. An accompanying exhibition will open at 7:00 pm, remaining on view until Sunday, August 12. More information on the participants after the break.

The participants in this round table will be:

- Ole Bouman, general director of Architecture Institute
- Helena Casanova, founding partner of Casanova+Hernandez architects, guest lecturer at the Berlage Institute
- Jean-Louis Cohen, professor in the History of Architecture at the Institute of the Fine Arts at New York University, lecturer at the Berlage Institute
- Galit Eliat writer, curator and founding director of The Israeli Center for Digital Art in Holon
- Jesus Hernandez, founding partner of Casanova+Hernandez architects, guest lecturer at the Berlage Institute
- Alessandro Petti, architect, urbanist, and researcher. Director of The Decolonizing Architecture Institute (DAAR)
- Lars Lerup, designer and writer, professor of Architecture at Rice School of Architecture
- Michelle Provoost, director at INTI International New Town Institute and partner bij crimson architectural historians
- Nanne de Ru, founding partner of Powerhouse Company
- Dietmar Steiner, director Architecture Center Vienna
- Elma van Boxel, founding partner of ZUS and curator of the 5th International Architecture Biennale

Kristian Koreman, founding partner of ZUS and curator of the 5th International Architecture Biennale

 

Cite: "‘Can Public Space be Used to Regenerate Urban Life?’ Roundtable Discussion / Casanova + Hernandez Architecten" 26 Jun 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 23 Nov 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=248293>