Jeroen Bosch Hospital / EGM architecten

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Architects: EGM architecten
Location: , The Netherlands
Project Area: 170,000 sqm
Project Year: 2010
Client: Jeroen Bosch Hospital
Photographs: Courtesy of EGM architecten

The ambition of the Jeroen Bosch Hospital is to become the most patient-friendly hospital in Netherlands. EGM architecten translated this ambition into a building with a clever layout, ample daylight, playful interior and accessible, green outdoor spaces.

Courtesy of EGM architecten

The Jeroen Bosch Hospital building is the largest non-academic hospital in the Netherlands. It arises from a merger of three smaller hospitals and the collaboration with other institutions. A comprehensive analysis of the organization lies on the basis of the design. This required consultation with over fifty user groups. The results are combined with the latest international findings in the areas of care, creating a modern and smoothly functioning complex.

Courtesy of EGM architecten

The hospital consists of four elongated building components, among which gardens are created. With the small boulevard, which connects the buildings, the extensive complex was able to be translated down to a more human scale. Those walking in through the main entrance are immediately led to the first floor, where the boulevard opens up to the various departments. Walking routes along the outer façades allow for easy orientation.

Plan

Part of the former William Alexander Hospital is located in the Jeroen Bosch Hospital. EGM also designed the new building belonging to the complex of the Tolbrug Rehabilitation Centre, the Senior Centre and Hospital of Psychiatry and the Verbeeten Institute. The hospital also concerned the renovation of the Willem Alexander tower. This building houses a large amount of innovative laboratories.

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* Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.
Cite: "Jeroen Bosch Hospital / EGM architecten" 02 Jul 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 23 Aug 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=246400>

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