Conference and Exhibition Center / Dominique Perrault Architecture

© DPA / Adagp

The winning proposal for the conference and exhibition center in Leon, by Dominique Perrault Architecture stands on the grounds of the old Sugar Santa Elvira and involves the transformation of the main building of the former sugar in Congress Hall (Grand Palais) and the creation of an Exhibition center located to the east side of the Palace of Congress. More images and architects’ description after the break.

© DPA / Adagp

The recovery of a second existing building (petit palais) is located on the west side of Congress Hall, hosts a number of complementary uses the program of conferences and exhibitions (restoration, exhibitions and small format offices). The project is part of the reflection of the urban century. Together with the integration of the rail, resulting from the advent of high speed, the Conference Centre is one of the key urban interventions for the development of the city.

© DPA / Adagp

The operation implies both the recovery of the neighborhood called La Vega and its final integration in the city of Leon. The design is equipped with a conference center with an auditorium for 1200 people, meeting rooms, exhibition halls, offices etc. and Exhibition Centre with a total useful exposure of 10, 000 m², divisible into three spaces of approximately 3,000 m² each.

© DPA / Adagp

While the Conference Centre consists of the rehabilitation and adaptation of the old main building of the Santa Elvira sugar, the Palace Exhibition offers a cutting-edge architecture of steel and glass, integrated solutions and renewable energy production energy control systems.

Architects: Dominique Perrault Architecture
Location: , Spain
Client: City of León
Solar Surface: 25,000 m²
Floor Area: 41,000 m²
Building Volume: 318,000 m³
Urban Intervention: 30,000 m²
Start of Construction: 2009
Estimated Completion Date: 2011

Cite: Furuto, Alison. "Conference and Exhibition Center / Dominique Perrault Architecture" 07 May 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 01 Nov 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=224283>