‘LEGO® Architecture: Towering Ambition’ Exhibition

Courtesy of Adam Reed Tucker

Three companies demonstrated their commitment to the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. by recreating significant works in LEGO® bricks in the spirit of the Museum’s current and landmark exhibition LEGO® Architecture: Towering Ambition. These three new models, containing more than 77,000 LEGO® bricks join the gallery already showcasing LEGO® models of 15 of the world’s most iconic buildings.

The original 15 were created by LEGO® certified professional Adam Reed Tucker, one of only 11 LEGO® certified professionals in the world. The Museum’s LEGO® Architecture exhibition is among the most popular in Museum history and has had more than 214,000 visitors since it opened in July 2010 and will be exhibited until September 3, 2012. More information on the exhibition after the break.

The contributing companies are Robert A.M. Stern Architects, LLP who made a LEGO® version of 15 Central Park West, a signature building in Manhattan attracting celebrity residents such as Sting and Denzel Washington; ZGF Architects LLP who made a section of a Washington, D.C. Metro station; and Gulick Group who created a traditional center hall colonial home that represents a popular choice for families in the D.C. area.

15 Central Park West
Architect: Robert A.M. Stern Architects, LLP
Location: New York, New York
Building Height: 548 ft., 35 stories
Number of LEGO® pieces used: 30,000
LEGO® Model Design Time: 100 hours; Build Time: 100 hours

“We’re very proud that our 15 Central Park West has been accepted as one of New York’s most beloved buildings in just a few short years,” said Paul L. Whalen, Partner at Robert A.M. Stern Architects. “Interpretation in LEGO® bricks is appropriate because 15 is essentially a traditional orthogonal masonry building. The challenge was the multitude of special architectural elements and gestures that break down the scale of this large residential building and help to make it an icon on the skyline.”

Halloween Night on the Metro
LEGO® Architect: ZGF Architects LLP [Metro’s iconic stations were designed by architect Harry Weese]
Location: Washington Metropolitan Area
Building and Station Height: 90’ for buildings, 90’ for metro station 12 stories above ground, 2 stories below ground
Number of LEGO® pieces uses: 23,117; staff contributed more than 500 “reclaimed” LEGO® bricks and other materials
LEGO® Model Design Time: 12 hours; Build Time: 93 hours

“ZGF is delighted to present a section of the D.C. Metro system. We brainstormed a lot of ideas and we wanted to build something that we all experience. We easily landed on the Metro. We admire both the beautiful station design and how transit enhances the quality of life in the D.C. area,” said Margaret DeBolt, AIA, Partner at ZGF Architects. She added, “the team had a lot of fun—as you can see in our version of a typical Halloween night on the Metro, when a rider experiences all sorts of scary characters and situations from the train platform up the escalator and to the street beyond.”

The Winthrop, of the Signature Series [Arriving in the exhibition in mid-April]
Designer/Builder: Gulick Group
Location: Autumn Woods in Great Falls, Virginia
Building Height: 36 ft., 3 stories
Number of LEGO® pieces used: 24,000
LEGO® Model Design Time: 116 hours; Build time: 220 hours

“The Winthrop plan is Gulick Group’s most popular and enduring, and though it has evolved and iterated over the years, the core concept can be found in many Gulick communities. The impressive elevation and interesting roofline of the Winthrop define the character of Gulick homes, and the plan has been popular and enduring in prestigious Virginia suburbs,” remarked Peter Gulick, President and CEO.

The National Building Museum is open seven days a week, from 10 am to 5 pm Monday through Saturday and 11 am to 5 pm on Sunday. Admission fees apply. For more information, please visit here.

Cite: Furuto, Alison. "‘LEGO® Architecture: Towering Ambition’ Exhibition" 05 Apr 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 24 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=223209>

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