Tondonia Winery Pavilion / Zaha Hadid

Rafael López de Heredia Tondonia Winery is one of the oldest and more famous in the Spanish region of La Rioja. To celebrate their 125th anniversary they decided to rehabilitate a very old store that the founder took to Brussel’s World Fair in 1910 and had been disassembled ever since.

In 2002 current owners (direct descendants of the founder), discovered how beautiful the old store was and decided to built an exterior volume to house the old store. This would become the future wine store and a place where visitors could taste the great wines they produce. This pavillion is only part of all the project that will include three more tasting rooms and a cleaning room. More images and architect’s description after the break.

The adage that from small beginnings many things may grow applies well to this project. The client, famous family bodegas of Rioja came to us with the intention of designing a pavilion to contain an older pavilion. The old pavilion had been found in their outhouses and restored to its original condition. It had been originally commissioned by the great grandfather for the world fair exhibition in 1910. The proprietors of the bodegas had a long succession of adding their built presence to the tradition of the bodegas.

The new pavilion was to be exhibited at the Alimentaria Fair in Barcelona and afterwards relocated to the bodegas at Haro in Rioja. In time the pavilion would be superseded by a new extension of cultural buildings. As such it was a stepping-stone,a bridge between the past,present and future development of the bodegas. For us the starting point was to jump into the future to determine how the present would evolve. We began this project by a series of studies exploring how the bodegas could evolve. Working backwards from these studies the pavilion began to emerge in tandem.

The pavilion would house the past the old pavilion. Made from timber and designed in a fin de scele style the old pavilion became a jewel within a new container. Like a series of Russian dolls the new pavilion itself was to be eventually housed within the new extension at the bodegas. The new pavilion would be just one layer in a larger composition.

Proceeding with this almost onion analogy, various studies led to a container developed in sectional cuts. The section distorts from a rectangle around the old pavilion to a distorted memory shape resembling a decanter. Which was not an intentional end point but once noticed it could not be ignored that we had designed a new bottle for an old wine.

Architect: Zaha Hadid
Location: Haro, La Rioja,
Project Architect: Jim Heverin
Design Team: Jim Heverin, Tiago Correia, Raza Hadid
Local Architect: I.O.A. Arquitectura – Joan Ramon Rius, Nuria Ayala, Xavier Medina, Candi Casadevall
Client: Rafael López de Heredia Tondonia Winery
Structural Engineers: Jane Wernick Associates
Area: 800m2
Year: 2001-2006

Cite: Jordana, Sebastian. "Tondonia Winery Pavilion / Zaha Hadid" 14 May 2009. ArchDaily. Accessed 24 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=22061>

36 comments

  1. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Does anyone know for what the roof is for? I cannot figure out any function. A waste of money but surprisingly it fits well on the photos. Reminds me of Gehry’s berlin project at Pariser-Platz.

  2. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Does anyone know for what David Klemmer is for? I cannot figure out any function.

  3. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Little by little I’ve come to the conclusion that I don’t like her anymore… And, strangely, I’m starting to doubt if I ever did…

  4. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    A very well manner piece (some might say tame) from the Hadid office. If they never go beyond this point, I can learn to love their work. Technically, from the information provided, her office have exercise diligence over the site and the client’s wish, and the result is quite “sexy” externally (perhaps cos I’ve had quite a bit of Rioja down my throat). However, this project could have been from any office that have chosen to work within this aesthetics. BUT, my spirit will always be lifted if every time I round a corner and be met with something like this. Erm, not too frequently please, for I would still like an element of surprise.

  5. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    seems obvious to me the metal roof is a reflector to showcase the skylight detail in the organic piece below

  6. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    A a piece of public sculpture, this is mediocre. I think its a stretch to say its good architecture. Reminds me of her closed-down, unusable Vitra fire station.

  7. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Looks like Zaha’s artistic freedom is taking over and dominating her current “productions”. Is this a sculpture or architecture? A whimsical form does not necessarily constitute a quality architecture. This is very weak… as a building.

  8. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    is there anything more stupid than making a “wine” pavillion with the shape of a “wine decanter”!!!???

  9. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Allow me to interpret the process:-
    1. the architecture is the sum total – below ground and above, therefore, what you see (the landscaping) is effectively “the roof”. The entrance, with the glass floor/roof, to the cellar is placed at the farthest corner. Hence the canopy or an entrance “marker” – it double as shelter for the “pod”.
    2. The pavilion or the “tasting room” is possibly changeable, but the footing is there. In its place, it is an elaborate rail to “channel” or “guide” you to the actual entrance to the cellar. Its bulges purposeful. It is the natural location and a linear progress for; after tasting, you visit/see the collection.
    3. the open space can house future “pods” and also nice space for mingling on a nice warm evening. Very Spanish, I think.
    So, in three steps, good architecture is created. Of course there is also all the detailing that goes with it.
    This project cannot be criticise simply because it is from Hadid. Criticism of work should never be so swift as before giving it analysis. Perhaps it the osmosis of the Rioja through my screen (powerful stuff) … I don’t know why I bother to elaborate.

  10. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    I disagree with the previous comments. I found this an rescatable project, perhaps one of the best in her latest fancy-fashion production. I guess nobody reads the project description, there are the answers for your questions:

    “The new pavilion was to be exhibited at the Alimentaria Fair in Barcelona and afterwards relocated to the bodegas at Haro in Rioja. In time the pavilion would be superseded by a new extension of cultural buildings.”

    “The pavilion would house the past the old pavilion. Made from timber and designed in a fin de scele style the old pavilion became a jewel within a new container. Like a series of Russian dolls the new pavilion itself was to be eventually housed within the new extension at the bodegas.”

    I love de Viña Tondonia Building in the first photo. Such a beautiful Red Door. I feel some kind of connection betwwen zaha´s pavilion and old building. A good project.

  11. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Cute operation: Make a profile elevation in Rhino, rotate copy 90 degrees to plan, move it, S-loft. Push and pull control points until it fits the god-damned program requirements. Ok, now Section Section Section! for ribs to make buildable smooth surfaces.

    There are cool shapes in the project, but it’s schizophrenic in composition and utterly cold and uninviting inside. What is that, Space Odyssey 2001? If I was drinking wine in there I’d half expect to see my future self hobbling out of the old bodega clutching a cane: “You punk, your drinking killed my liver!” Or maybe this is a clinic for winos escaped from THX 1138? I would prefer to see wood hex frame and hundreds of bottles stacked along the undulating walls, with intimate corners to sip Rioja. This is what a Japanese laboratory that creates synthetic Bordeaux looks like.

    That said, I wouldn’t mind having a Zaha action figure and collectible models of her buildings.

  12. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    mdh, I hope you don’t come to this website for the comments. Say something un-f***ing annoying then…

  13. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Like jesus turned water into wine …
    Zaha turned people into wine…
    with this ridiculous decanter: postmodernism,
    get over it!

  14. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Bad interior. So cold and uncomfortable. Totally agree with that. The shape is quite sexy and looks totally zaha. But what happens on the right ? what is this unused space for ?

  15. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    it’s an old project, I saw it on a wine fair in barcelona several years ago. By that time I didn’t even knew it was made for Zaha. I just can remember I didn’t like it at all. But now it seems pretty to me.

  16. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    No access for people using wheelchair. No ramp.
    What if I make narrow door so the Zaha’s fat bottom couldn’t enter?

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