Alam Sutra Residence / Wahana Cipta Selaras

© Fernando Gomulya

Architects: Wahana Cipta Selaras
Location: Serpong, Tangerang,
Principal: Rudy Kelana
Design & Projects Architect: Matheus R.
Structure Consultant: Ricky Theo
Main Contractor: Neria Oendang
Project Year: 2010
Project Area: 524 sqm
Photographs: Fernando Gomulya

In urban lifestyle, residential concepts usually focus on the resident activity. This is the main concept that used in this house. The house located in the suburb area with good environment which created residential that has interactions with the landscape.

© Fernando Gomulya

The existing landscape with big three’s around the site, inspired this residential design to create a design that can “communicate” between inside and outside. The building mass connected with the landscape with many a small opening to expose the view to the landscape. This 380 sqm site was optimized to be able to fulfill all functions that the occupants needs.

Ground Floor Plan
© Fernando Gomulya

Tropical modern architecture style, selected to adapt with Indonesians tropical climate. Front façade reflected modernity with wooden box protruding from sloping roof behind it that gives impressions that there is two building mass. With plenty openings for natural lighting and air, wood and natural stone material, reflecting pool and vertical water feature that reflected the tropical style.

© Fernando Gomulya

In the interior, just like an urban house that has to accommodate all occupants’ activity in relatively small space, the layout was simple. With three zones vertically that represent private area for bedrooms at the top, semi private area for study room and library in the middle, public area at the lower level for living, dining, pantry and kitchen. The semi private area used as transitions between public and private area, placed at mezzanine level like a floating floor above dining and living area.

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Cite: "Alam Sutra Residence / Wahana Cipta Selaras" 21 Oct 2011. ArchDaily. Accessed 24 Nov 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=177566>