Emergency Shelter Partitions / Shigeru Ban Architects

Modular Partition System

A week ago, we shared our ideas about creating a system of temporary housing that could be rapidly constructed after a natural disaster.  Building upon that idea, today we are sharing Shigeru Ban’s cardboard partition system for the hundreds of people crowded into gymnasiums seeking refuge after the earthquake.  These simple partition shelters are a way to provide a sense of privacy to the families using a low cost, flexible and quick modular solution.

More after the break.

Shigeru Ban Architects Modular Partition System

Since the earthquake in Niigata back in 2004, Ban has transformed his paper and cardboard building construction typology into a partiting system to be used for temporary assemblies.  With cardboard tubing functioning as strut-beams, and plywood joints braced with ropes, each module measures 180cm square, and different sized rooms are established based on where the fabric walls are hung.

Shigeru Ban Architects Modular Partition System
Shigeru Ban Architects Modular Partition System

Source: designboom

Cite: Cilento, Karen. "Emergency Shelter Partitions / Shigeru Ban Architects" 29 Mar 2011. ArchDaily. Accessed 28 Jul 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=123165>

3 comments

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    Really simple, so that anyone can build it without any difficult in short time. This is the way emergency constructions should be. Please keep up the good work!

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